The Free Motion Quilting Project: To Sign or Not to Sign?

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

To Sign or Not to Sign?

Quick question for you this evening!

I've just created a series of 8" x 10" prints of several quilts from my gallery. I'm matting them and will soon add them to the Quilt Shop.

The question I have is this: Should I sign the mat board or sign the back of the print?

All of the photos have a black bleed right to the edges of the picture so there is no space on the print to sign. Instead I'd have to sign the mat board if the signature was to show up properly.

Here is a photo of the signature on the bottom, right hand corner on the mat board:

free motion quilting | Leah DayAnd here is a photo of a print signed on the back (no signature on the front):

free motion quilting | Leah DayAre there any artists out there with the "official" way this is usually done? I'm woefully ignorant when it comes to this sort of thing, so any helpful comments would be more than welcome!

Let's go quilt!

Leah Day

30 comments:

  1. Option 3) Go to an art store to find an appropriate white pen and sign the print.

    I think the signature should be on the print itself, so if signing the front is not an option go for the back. Of course I don't think I have any authority on this (well, IIRC I did have several art teachers who were insistent I have the guts to put my signature on my work).

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  2. I think you should sign on the front but on the print, not the mat. Try a fine white pen and see how it works.

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  3. I would do both. I would sign the back with a white pen, but I would also sign the mat as well. Any photography that I have that is worth anything is always signed on the matting.

    As an artist, I have always signed the front of a drawing in the bottom corner in a way that you could see it after adding the mat board. If you do it that way, then there is no need to sign the mat board.

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  4. white pen is a good idea, at any rate front and back is probably good to. part of the signature is to keep others from using your pic as theirs, sad but true.

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  5. Our professional photographer signs the mat in a framed portrait, but directly on the picture if not framed. I realize this is no help, but I do love how your signature looks on the mat.

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  6. We have bought a number of limited edition prints and they are all signed on the front - if you can't do it on the actual print then on the mat board (we have several like that). Some have an printed artists statement stuck onto the back of the picture.

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  7. You could try a silver Sharpie on the black, otherwise on the mat and on the back is good.
    Prior to printing the photo you can watermark them in an editing program, enabling you to include your logo (which includes your copyright).

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  8. I would like the print signed on the back.

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  9. I was going to say just what everyone else has said. They definitely should be signed on the front.

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  10. I agree with the previous comments -- white sig on the front of the print. Sign the back too.

    I don't mind the sig on the mat -- I have some artwork that is signed that way. But if you can put it on the print -- should it be reframed somewhere down the line, it's still signed.

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  11. white or silver pen and sign on the black part of the print. The photographer signed my daughter's 16x20 Baptismal portrait with a silver pen... looks neat.

    Love from Texas! ~bonnie

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  12. The print work I have done has all been signed on the area around the print or directly on the print.

    The picture framer in me says, "please, oh please do not sign the mat." Its the whole acid free/ what is the mat becomes damaged... ordeal.

    Most of the photographers work that we have framed have signed their prints in an ACID FREE ink. One that usually stands out a bit on the print. Gold & silver have been the favorites of a number of them. Gel usually works well.

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  13. Personally, I like it on the front and on the work that I am buying. The mat board can be removed easily, so your signature is gone. Be proud and sign your hard work!! Cheers, and good on you.

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  14. IMHO I would say you should sign the front in white. but if you can't then sign both front mat and back. the mat and print could be separated. I would also put on the back the name of the quilt and the date it was finished.

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  15. Oh, I agree that you must sign the front. If you can find a white pen, or even a silver sharpie maybe? But I would want to see your name on the front of the print when it was hanging on MY wall :)

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  16. For a handmade print, you'd put the title in one bottom corner, signature in the other. If there's an edition, it'd be title followed by the number of the edition, e.g. 6/10. (Most people wouldn't put the number of the print if the edition is huge.)

    I like the idea of signing on the print with a white pen. Don't sign on the mat board. Mats can change!

    When you do this again, consider leaving a white border around the print so that you have room for a signature.

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  17. Most definitely sign the print, either with a white/silver pen on the back or front of the print itself. The mat could sprout legs and walk away, leaving it unsigned and inidentifiable, which is a shame since all of your work is amazing. Make sure YOUR WORK is signed so everyone will know it is yours and credit will be given where credit is due.

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  18. I'm fairly new to quilting, so I don't know about the quilting world's thoughts on this. However, I do have an art degree, and in the art world you should always sign your work on the front...and on the mat if it's photography. Most people buying a piece of art aren't just buying the art, they are buying a piece of the artist, rather the right to show off the name of the artist.

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  19. I agree with the white pen/sign on the image crowd. Get a signature on there that can't be cropped out without losing some of the image.

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  20. I may not be an "artist" per se, but I would prefer to have your signature on the front. Other posters have suggested a white pen, scrapbooking supplies are achival safe, so there should be something out there that would work on the actual print.

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  21. I have no idea what is 'correct' but I like it signed on the front mat. (top picture) I would be happy to buy something signed like that.

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  22. I would suggest signing on the print, with a white pen.
    Why don't you ask Kaaren, over at thepaintedquilt.blogspot.com. She has been in the art industry for years, and would be able to give you some advice...
    Elzaan

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  23. I agree - sign the print with white pen

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  24. I'm staring at a painting I bought 10+ years ago and the mat is signed, not the painting itself. I think the answer is, "It's up to the artist." :)

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  25. You always want to sign the artwork itself, so if it and the mat become separated, your work is still signed.

    If the work is a photographic print, and the surface will not accept ink, then sign the mat (but also sign the back of the photograph itself. The artwork should always be signed.)

    Sign it for posterity. Sign so everybody will know you made it. Sign it because YOU made it. Sign it so your great grandchildren will know the name of the person who made it.

    But by all means, sign it.

    Lynne

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  26. I agree, the signature must be on the print itself. It could also be on the mat in addition, but the signature needs to be on the print to protect yourself. Have you thought of issuing a limited number of them and then numbering the prints, i.e. 129/200. Or if you don't limit the number of prints you issue, then just number them as you sign. That makes them more valuable in the long run. Just a thought. I think Nancy Crow numbers her autographs of her books. She also I think, keeps a log of when she signed and where they went, but that part I'm not sure. Your quilts are works of art and the prints will be a great way to get them out there! I would also suggest perhaps a few in a larger size than 8x10. Your quilts are so large and have a big feel to them. I would think perhaps 11x14 or 16x20 might more adequately represent the quilts. Also note cards might be nice.

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  27. Definitely sign the print itself. A mat can be changed.

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  28. Leah your Winter Wonderland Quilt photo is just amazing! At first glance I thought it was actual lace! Could you post a close up photo of this please!

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  29. Leah the Winter Wonderland photo is just amazing! At first glance I thought it was a photo of lace! Could you post a close-up photo of it so we can see all the detail?

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